THE SCOTTISH GENOMES PARTNERSHIP

 

Pioneering Scottish research in Human Genome discovery

The Scottish Genomes Partnership is currently leading on 4 key research areas. These are cancer, rare genetic diseases, a Scottish population study and a significant collaboration with the Genomics England 100,000 Genomes Project.

COLLABORATORS

The Scottish Genomes Partnership is a major Scotland-wide research programme between the Universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Dundee, with NHS Scotland, NHS Lothian, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde, NHS Grampian and NHS Tayside.

The programme is led by Professor Tim Aitman (University of Edinburgh) and Professor Andrew Biankin (University of Glasgow), and is funded by the Scottish Government's Chief Scientist Office and the UK's Medical Research Council.

The research includes a collaboration with the Genomics England 100,000 Genomes Project led by Professor Zosia Miedzybrodzka. Recruitment to this study was through the nationally designated NHS Scotland regional Clinical Genetics units and genetic laboratories in Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh and Glasgow. These sites provide Genetic services across Scotland and were able to recruit participants to the 100,000 Genomes Project from all over Scotland.

 

SGP RESEARCH

Cancer Programme
100,000 Genomes Project
Rare Disease Research Studies
VIKING Population Study
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WHAT IS GENOMICS?

Genomics brings together academic research, practising clinicians and commercial experts to understand more about how our genes affect our health and risks of disease. This research is finding new personalised treatments and medicines.

Genomes and DNA

Your genome is your body's instruction manual, with all the information needed to make, run and repair you. It is made of DNA and there is a copy in every cell of your body.

Whole Genome Sequencing

A technique used to "read" all of the DNA in a person's genes letter by letter, to allow scientists to compare it with the DNA of other people.

Genome damage

Sometimes when our cells divide, a mistake happens when our DNA is copied. This is a gene mutation - which can be thought of as a glitch - and can lead to illness.

If you're interested in learning more about Whole Genome Sequencing and the use of Genomics in Healthcare, you can sign up for free online courses available though FutureLearn (part of The Open University).

 
 

LATEST NEWS

New cancer treatment leads the way
25th April 2019

With funding from the Scottish Genomes Partnership, scientists at the University of Glasgow's Precision Oncology Laboratory (GPOL) have developed a new way to report on all the genomic aspects of a patient's tumour in a single test.

20190425 Cooke UoG video for BBC Scotlan
Public dialogue on Genomic Medicine report
25th April 2019

This report explored public aspirations, concerns and expectations about the development of genomic medicine in the UK. It was co-funded by Genomics England, the Scottish Genomes Partnership and UK Research and Innovation's Sciencewise programme.

20190425 Ipsos Mori Public Dialogue cove
Part of a genetic health revolution
18th April 2019

The Scotsman - Already Scots are being offered genetic tests as part of their healthcare. The ability to analyse a person’s entire DNA offers the opportunity to diagnose common and rare genetic conditions in a more comprehensive way.

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  • Scottish Genomes on Twitter

CONTACT US

Before you contact us, please read our Privacy Policy and make sure you are happy with how we will use your information.

We would prefer you not to send us detailed personal information such as your address, date of birth or detailed health information, but if you do decide to do this we will always aim to protect this information.

Project participants for Scottish participation in the 100,000 Genomes Project who want to find out about the status of their results should contact their local genetics clinic as we do not have this information.

 

© 2019 Scottish Genomes Partnership

Scottish Genomes Partnership gratefully acknowledges the funding received from the Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health Directorates and the Medical Research Council Whole Genome Sequencing for Health and Wealth Initiative.